What is Dilantin?

Dilantin (phenytoin) is an anti-epileptic drug, also called an anticonvulsant. It works by slowing down impulses in the brain that cause seizures.

Dilantin is used to control seizures. Phenytoin does not treat all types of seizures, and your doctor will determine if it is the right medicine for you.

Dilantin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information

You should not use Dilantin if you also take delavirdine (Rescriptor), or if you are allergic to phenytoin, ethotoin (Peganone), fosphenytoin (Cerebyx), or mephenytoin (Mesantoin). If you are pregnant, DO NOT START TAKING Dilantin unless your doctor tells you to. Phenytoin may cause harm to an unborn baby, but having a seizure during pregnancy could harm both the mother and the baby. If you become pregnant while taking Dilantin, DO NOT STOP TAKING the medicine without your doctor’s advice. Seizure control is very important during pregnancy and the benefits of preventing seizures may outweigh any risks posed by using Dilantin.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, depression, anxiety, or if you feel agitated, hostile, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use Dilantin you are allergic to phenytoin or similar medicines such as ethotoin (Peganone), fosphenytoin (Cerebyx), or mephenytoin (Mesantoin), or if you have:

  • a history of liver problems caused by phenytoin;
  • a heart condition called 2nd or 3rd degree “AV block”;
  • a history of slow heartbeats that have caused you to faint; or
  • a condition for which you also take delavirdine (Rescriptor).
  • To make sure Dilantin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:
  • liver disease;
  • a history of abnormal heart rhythm found on an EKG (electrocardiograph);
  • diabetes;
  • a history of depression;
  • a history of suicidal thoughts or actions;
  • a vitamin D deficiency or any other condition that causes thinning of the bones;
  • porphyria (a genetic enzyme disorder that causes symptoms affecting the skin or nervous system); or
  • if you drink large amounts of alcohol.

How should I take Dilantin?

Take Dilantin exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Do not crush, chew, break, or open an extended-release capsule. Swallow it whole. Do not use any Dilantin capsule that has changed colors. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

The chewable tablet must be chewed before you swallow it.

Tell your doctor if this medicine does not seem to work as well in treating your condition.

Wear a medical alert tag or carry an ID card stating that you take Dilantin. Any medical care provider who treats you should know that you take seizure medication.

Phenytoin can cause swelling in your gums. Brush and floss your teeth and visit your dentist regularly to help prevent this problem.

 What should I avoid while taking Dilantin?

  • Avoid drinking alcohol while you are taking Dilantin. Alcohol use can increase your blood levels of phenytoin and may increase side effects. Daily alcohol use can decrease your blood levels of phenytoin, which can increase your risk of seizures.
  • Avoid taking antacids at the same time you take Dilantin. Antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb the medication.
  • Dilantin may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Dilantin side effects

  • Decreased coordination
  • mental confusion
  • nervousness
  • slurred speech
  • trouble with breathing, speaking, or swallowing
  • unsteadiness, trembling, or other problems with muscle control or coordination
  • Inability to move the eyes
  • increased blinking or spasms of the eyelid
  • shakiness and unsteady walk shakiness in the legs, arms, hands, or feet
  • sticking out of the tongue
  • trembling or shaking of the hands or feet
  • twitching, twisting, or uncontrolled repetitive movements of the tongue, lips, face, arms, or legs
  • uncontrolled twisting movements of the neck, trunk, arms, or legs
  • unusual facial expressions

 For more information visit us our website:  www.medypharma.com